So long to an old supplier

Corsair is cutting corners

I have been building computer systems professionally since 1990. Before that it was merely a hobby. Through the years I came to trust certain vendors for parts more so than others. EVGA for their video cards, Antec Cases, Corsair RAM and Power supplies, Kingston RAM…. others come to mind but I am digressing. The point of this post is to explain what occurred that convinced me that continuing business with Corsair after 15 years and 1000s of reliable parts purchases is not in my best interest.

Corsair has begun to build and manufacture their own line of pre-built computers. This is a serious point of contention for their clients that purchase parts to build computers with professionally. They can of course exceed the buying power of any modest level builder or team of builders. I am not pleased about this but it was not quite enough to force my hand. You do not make money from your clients business to put further your own business when it is convenient for you to do so, by becoming their direct competitor. Very very bush league.

The final straw

The issue that ended it for me was a rather silly one. I have a power supply I purchased and use for one of my own personal computers, from Corsair. It is a very expensive high end AX860 power supply with a 10 year warranty covering parts and labor. I applied for an RMA for one of the cables for the unit. Five years of use had made the cable inflexible and brittle. I intended to transplant the power supply from the dated computer into a new build. I took a photo of the cable attaching it to the RMA request. I was informed that Corsair does not warranty items for usual wear and tear of standard use. Think about this for a moment. If they do not warranty any items for usual wear and tear of standard use, just what exactly do they warranty? If I put the item on a shelf in a storage locker for 7 years and then use it and it fails perhaps? After a time a higher level member of Corsair contacted me about the cable and offered to replace it free. I refused the offer. I do not want to be given special favor for having been a customer for years on a builder level. I want Corsair to reconsider their policy on warranty. The current one leaves considerable room for improvement.

Conclusion

If Corsair can not replace $5 worth of cables after five years of use, what if I have a client’s system that the PSU entirely fails on, what then? This totally undermines the validity of any warranty corsair might offer in my view. It also puts any future warranty or policies they MIGHT try to offer to counter the negatives of the current policies and procedures. Luckily I have only needed to RMA about 5 items to Corsair in 15 years and tens of thousands of parts ordered. Now they have lost my brand loyalty. I buy power supplies from EVGA and RAM from G.Skill instead. I trust those companies to make good on their warranties when asked to do so. I sincerely hope that your experiences with Corsair are better than my results were in this instance.

The Photo FINISH


Boot time variance between two high-end rigs

I have two computers that I use for my primary desktops. One I built in July of 2018. The other I built in April of 2019.

System 1

Intel i7 8700K 4.3Ghz CPU
ASUS ROG Strix Z370-E Motherboard
Corsair Carbide 600Q inverse Case
Corsair H115i Pro CPU Cooler
Corsair HX750i Power Supply
G.Skill Ripjaws V DD4 32G RAM
Samsung 960 Pro 512G NVMe drive
Western Digital 2TB Black Hard drive
EVGA GTX 1080ti FTW3 GPU
NZXT internal USB USB Hub
Netgear A7000 wireless External wireless adapter

System 2

AMD Ryzen 2 2700 4.1Ghz CPU
ASUS ROG STRIX B450-F Motherboard
Corsair Carbide 100R Case
AMD Wraith Prism CPU Cooler
EVGA 500W Power Supply
EVGA DDR4 2400 16G RAM
Crucial P1 1TB NVMe drive
ASUS GTX 1060 3G GPU
Netgear A7000 wireless External wireless adapter

Results

Systems were both rebooted 10 times with Windows 10 Pro with the latest updates installed. The times were averaged.

System 1 reboots in 23.47 seconds

System 2 reboots in 36.59 seconds

Fedora 18 firewall.

I upgraded to Fedora 18.  Then verified my web server was running.  Then attempted to visit this site.  I was not able to.    The problem was the new firewall daemon in Fedora 18.   Despite the config file indicating that port 80 was open for http traffic, it was not.

I had to install firewall-config.

yum install -y firewall-config

Then I used firewall-config enable traffic for port 80.  This solved the problem.

Apache web server 2.4 on Fedora 18

I recently upgraded my web server system from Fedora 17 to Fedora 18.  I used fedup to do so.  The upgrade went fairly smooth.

A couple days later I noticed that Apache ( httpd ) was not running.   In the course of trouble shooting I had to disable selinux.    When I enabled selinux again, there was a new issue.

The first issue I noticed is that by default, the ServerName directive in the apache config (httpd.conf) file is remarked out.

The error shows up as the following in your /var/log/httpd/error_log file.

Could not reliably determine the server’s fully qualified domain name

The solution for that error is to edit your /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf file.

Change the line (line 95 in my file) that reads

#ServerName

to

ServerName localhost

The next error:

No such file or directory: AH01762: Failed to create shared memory segment on file /run/httpd/authdigest_shm

Which had the following error hand in hand with it:

no such file or directory: AH01760: failed to initialize shm – all nonce-count checking, one-time nonces, and MD5-sess algorithm disabled

Both of these errors can be fixed by creating the /run/httpd directory and then changing the ownership to apache and group to apache.  This seems to be a result of disabling and then enabling selinux.

mkdir /run/httpd/

chown -R apache /run/httpd

chgrp -R apache /run/httpd