Howto: create a local repository for Fedora.

Creating a local Fedora repository is a great way to conserve bandwidth. You can update all of the computers on your local network from one repository.

1)  Install a web server.  I use apache.
su -c yum install httpd -y

2)  Create the directories that become the local repository.
su -c mkdir -p /var/www/html/yum/F15/releases
su -c mkdir -p /var/www/html/yum/F15/updates

3) Install the remote synchronization tool rsync.
su -c yum install rsync -y

4) Use rsync to populate your repository.
/usr/bin/rsync -avrt rsync://linux.mirrors.es.net/fedora/linux/updates/15/x86_64/ –exclude=debug/ /var/www/html/yum/F15/updates
/usr/bin/rsync -avrt rsync://linux.mirrors.es.net/fedora/linux/releases/15/Everything/x86_64/os/Packages/ /var/www/html/yum/F15/everything

I create a cron job for the rsync process. The following synchronizes daily.
su -c touch /etc/cron.daily/rsyncfedora15.cron
su – gedit /etc/cron.daily/rsyncfedora15.cron

Paste the 3 lines of code below into the rsyncfedora15.cron file.
#!/bin/bash
/usr/bin/rsync -avrt rsync://linux.mirrors.es.net/fedora/linux/updates/15/x86_64/ --exclude=debug/ /var/www/html/yum/F15/updates >> /var/log/rsync15updates.log
/usr/bin/rsync -avrt rsync://linux.mirrors.es.net/fedora/linux/releases/15/Everything/x86_64/os/Packages/ /var/www/html/yum/F15/everything >> /var/log/rsync15.log

Then save the file.
This also creates and appends two log files rsync15update.log and rsync15.log in the /var/log directory.

The first time the repository synchronizes it may take considerable time and bandwidth.  Be patient for the process to complete.

If you do NOT plan to make a full mirror of an existing Fedora repository you should use the createrepo tool to create and populate the data files and directories correctly.
su -c yum install createrepo

Then
su
createrepo -v -p -d –deltas /var/www/html/yum/F15/everything

Now you have created the repository for Fedora 15.

Next I create files in my  /etc/yum.repos.d/  called local.repo and localupdates.repo

local.repo has the following in it:

[local]
name=Fedora $releasever – $basearch
failovermethod=priority
baseurl=http://192.168.1.100/yum/F15/everything/i686/
#mirrorlist=https://mirrors.fedoraproject.org/metalink?repo=fedora-$releasever&arch=$basearch
enabled=1
metadata_expire=7d
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-fedora-$basearch

localupdates.repo:

[local-updates]
name=Fedora $releasever – $basearch – Updates
failovermethod=priority
baseurl=http://192.168.1.100/yum/F14/updates/i686/
#mirrorlist=https://mirrors.fedoraproject.org/metalink?repo=updates-released-f$releasever&arch=$basearch
enabled=1
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-fedora-$basearch

Then I copy those two files to all of my systems.

Howto: create a custom spin of Fedora 13

Much of the documentation I read on the World Wide Web suggests using revisor to create a custom Spin of Fedora. I find that revisor is not well suited to my needs. I use LiveCD Creator. To install it:
yum install livecd-tools -y

I suggest you install the fedora-kickstarts and spin-kickstarts packages as well.
yum install spin-kickstarts* -y

Another tool I use is liveUSB-Creator.
yum install liveusb-creator -y

Once you have those installed you can use your favorite text editor to modify the existing Kickstart files to suiit your needs.
The files are installed by default to the /usr/share/spin-kickstarts/ directory. Be sure to save the files as different file names once you have edited them to suit your needs.
I save them as fedora-custom-base.ks and fedora-custom-kde.ks

Once that is completed you can run the liveCD Creator to create the custom spin in the directory you wish to save the .iso image to.
setenforce 0
livecd-creator
--config=/usr/share/spin-kickstarts/fedora-custom-kde.ks
--fslabel=F13x64-Custom

If that command completes successfully, you will have a F13x64-Custom.iso in the directory. If it does not, the kickstart file has an error.

Next you can use the LiveUSB-Creator tool to burn that custom image to a USB drive. Be sure to create an overlay when doing so. I use 1024M as my overlay size.

For a more detailed article on creating a LiveUSB drive visit the following:
Howto LiveUSB

Howto: Fedora® LiveUSB

What is a LiveUSB?

It is a condensed (Live image) version of Fedora® you can install to a flash drive. You can then boot to Fedora from the flash drive on any computer. You can also install Fedora to any system from the LiveUSB.

There is an easy to implement option. This may be a great way for you to try Fedora without installing it to your computer.

I even carry Fedora in my pocket on a LiveUSB. It weighs a lot less than my laptop. When you boot a LiveUSB stick it does not install any files on the computer’s hard drive(s).

You will need the following:

A flash drive. Preferably an 8G or larger unit but a 4G unit will work. 2G and smaller not recommended.
The LiveUSB utility from the Fedora web site.
A Live image of the version of Fedora you wish to use.

1) Determine whether you would prefer the 32 bit version or the 64 bit version. If you are going to use the LiveUSB as your OS in your pocket the 32 bit version is a better choice. You can use the 32 bit version on just about any computer on the planet. The 64 bit version will not work on older computers.

2) Determine which Desktop manager you would prefer. KDE and Gnome are the standard desktop managers and I prefer KDE.

3) Download the appropriate Live image. Save it to a hard drive.

4) Download and install the LiveUSB creator tool.

5) Use the LiveUSB creator tool to install the live image to your flash drive. Be sure to include a 1024MB or larger overlay.

Here are the various downloads:

Fedora KDE Live Images

Fedora KDE 32 bit Live Image
Fedora KDE 64 bit Live Image

Fedora Gnome Live Images

Fedora Gnome 32 bit Live Image
Fedora Gnome 64 bit Live Image

LiveUSB creator

LiveUSB Creator for Windows
LiveUSB Creator for Fedora – Use yum or yumex to install the liveusb-creator package.

Browser choices launch via Windows in the European Union

As part of the settlement Microsoft lost in the European Union, Microsoft is now required to provide a Windows update that offers computer users in the European Union choices for web browsers.   I encountered the site early this morning while browsing the web and found it to be utterly amusing.   If you would like to see the site for yourself visit Browser Choice Site. You can also read my reviews of browsers.

WebDAV and Windows XP Pro x64

They seem to have MAJOR compatibility issues.   I have attempted to use WebDAV to connect with OfficeLive web servers.   Using Windows XP Pro x64 with the latest service pack and Windows updates installed, I have had no success.   Windows XP Pro x64 is the fastest Microsoft operating system available.  This taints my love of Windows XP Pro x64.